The Worst Staging, But The Best Way To Live...

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Worst Staging, Best Living :: House of Valentina

Your home has two wardrobes.  One for living and, if you decide to sell it, another for listing. This home literally has the worst staging possible.  It goes against even my own passion for "lived in staging".

My sellers struggle with this all. the. time.  They want to live in their home until the day they sell, but it's just not realistic!  If  you want to make the most from your investment then you really need to declutter and simplify your home so buyers can imagine themselves in your space.

But once you buy?  Bring on the clutter, the layers, and all the stuff you want.  

The beautiful home of Artist Jack Pierson in Greenwich Village screams, "I live here."  It's filled with an intoxicating level of curiosity and wonder.  It feels more like a scene pulled straight from a favorite movie than real life.  It is alive and just the kind of place that buyers should hope to create.  Jack says,

"“I decided that I wanted it to look like an apartment that a rich aunt—one I didn’t know I had—had left to me..."

Inspired by the residence of Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé, which he was sent to photograph just before the big sale at Christie’s following Saint Laurent’s death, Jack had a life-altering vision for how he wanted to live.

“I loved the layering of objects, how the shelves were filled right to the top,”

So, if you are trying to sell your home, consider the investment you have made and pack up your layers, but if you are settling in, layer, layer, layer!  Your home should be about living!

Worst Staging, Best Living :: House of Valentina Worst Staging, Best Living :: House of Valentina Worst Staging, Best Living :: House of Valentina Worst Staging, Best Living :: House of ValentinaWorst Staging, Best Living :: House of Valentina

Worst Staging, Best Living :: House of Valentina

These photos, links to products, & more can be found at Architectural Digest.

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